ValueWalk

I See A Black Moon Rising: Crypto Tokens and the Future of Investment

I write for the finance and investment website ValueWalk. My post entitled I See a Black Moon Rising is now online. Here is an excerpt:

When companies launch their ICO, they issue crypto tokens in exchange for investment cash. The tokens are built on top of the blockchain platform, and their owners can trade them as they wish.

Sergey Vasin, Chief Investment Officer of Blackmoon points out, “Tokenized funds are more cost-efficient thanks to lower infrastructure and setup costs…This economy is transmitted to investors in the form of higher net return. For the cherry on top, fund tokens are also immediately tradable.”

This new economy gives rise to two major opportunities. First, the token-based investment process should be more transparent and auditable due to its blockchain roots. Secondly, this improved “open book” approach offers the potential to expand the market beyond cryptocurrencies and incorporate fiat currency into the portfolio.

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Bitcoin And The Future Of Futures

I write for the finance and investment website ValueWalk. My post entitled Bitcoin And The Future Of Futures is now online. Here is an excerpt:

Some retailers around the world already accept Bitcoin, but they do so on a spot market basis, exchanging the bitcoins for their own currency within seconds of acceptance. Some might say that demotes the status of Bitcoin to a mere novelty version of money, since it cannot stand on its own. Others will say the transaction is on par with any other foreign currencies that retailers might accept at the day’s exchange rate.

Volatility is the problem that leads to the question, “Why can’t Bitcoin be purchased on a futures market like oil?” Oil also has an issue with volatility, as can be seen every time a major refinery catches fire, or an oil producing nation decides to turn the taps off. But with oil and other commodities, futures are based on a delivery of tangible product, like an actual barrel of oil or bushel of wheat. With Bitcoin, there are no actual coins, there is simply the value of those coins, agreed upon by its users and miners, and based on faith paired with scarcity.

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WannaCry, Mixers, And Bitcoin Wallets

I write for the finance and investment website ValueWalk. My post entitled WannaCry, Mixers, And Bitcoin Wallets is now online. Here is an excerpt:

Amid the furor of the August 1 Bitcoin Fork, another interesting thing happened. The individual(s) behind the WannaCry ransomware attack started to empty their bitcoin wallets. The $140,000 worth of bitcoin they originally collected gained about 20% more in value during the split, and it was around that time that the virtual money started to move.

The activity was detected by Keith Collins of Quartz, who used a bot to watch for movement in the accounts. The bot observed the initial withdrawal of $70,000, which was then followed by additional amounts from other bitcoin wallets until all the money was gone.

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What Is Ethereum And How To Buy It?

I write for the finance and investment website ValueWalk and I posted my commentary entitled What Is Ethereum And How To Buy It? there today. Here is an excerpt:

Let’s start by getting the terminology straight. Ethereum is an open source code designed primarily to govern smart contracts on the blockchain. A smart contract is any contract between parties, especially those that lack a level of trust or credit rating. An example may be the sale of fair trade coffee. How would a wholesale purchaser know the coffee is fair trade? They would feel much more confident if the entire coffee production and preparation process was verified and incorporated into a smart contract that itself is sealed immutably inside a block on the blockchain. Ethereum allows developers to build their own apps on its open platform.

Part of the Ethereum code is Ether, described as the fuel that makes the contracts work. It can also be seen as a currency of sorts, and may emerge as a competitor to, or even replacement for Bitcoin, depending on how the lava flows. Ether is presented in coins, and can also be referred to as an Ethereum coin.

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ValueWalk Post: How To Buy Bitcoin: A Guide For Beginners

I write for the finance and investment website ValueWalk. My post entitled How To Buy Bitcoin: A Guide For Beginners is now online. Here is an excerpt:

First, the Wallet

You’ll need a wallet. Not a nice leather billfold, because Bitcoins are not physical. There are no coins and no paper bills involved. It is all virtual. The Bitcoin wallet is an app that you can download to your phone, and your computer. It contains two 16-digit passwords: one is called a public key, and the other is a private key.

Quite simply, when you buy Bitcoin, your wallet sends your public key information to the vendor, the same way you would enter a credit card number into an online form. The public key tells the vendor’s app where to send the Bitcoin amount. The private key is the password you employ to confirm the transaction from your end. This one-time code is reviewed by the computers on the blockchain, who then approve the transaction unanimously as representing your receipt of a certain amount of Bitcoin. Once the code has been accepted by the computers on the blockchain, your wallet’s information will say it has some Bitcoin in it, and then the code is sealed permanently into the next block on the chain.

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