Big Data

Uber’s Surge Pricing Model And Free Market Economics

This blog post, written for KPMG , entitled, The Surge Pricing Model And Free Market Economics is available for review at CloudTweaks.com. This post proposes that the dynamic nature of pricing under the Uber model might work in surprising ways for B2B purchasers who do not update their procurement processes.  Click here to read.

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Furthering Business By Seeing Beyond

This blog post, written for HP’s Business Value Exchange , entitled Furthering Your Business by Seeing Beyond is available for review at CloudTweaks.com. This post discusses customer service, empowerment and sales proactivity, supported by increasingly available customer data.  Click here to read.

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The Importance of Practical Experience in Cloud Security

My blog post for cloud security firm (ISC)2 , entitled, The Importance of Practical Experience in Cloud Security is available for review at CloudTweaks.com. Based on interviews with security experts, the post discusses why it is critical that cloud security experts come with years of experience to handle the challenges of security online.  Click here to read.

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The Internet of Everything and Corporate Life

July 17, 2014

In addition to my own posts, I also write for CloudTweaks, an authority on cloud computing. Cloudtweaks is currently working with Cisco, who have released and exciting new thought leadership platform called InnovateThink. I have been asked to contribute some material to this project, and it is an honor to do so.

My seventh article looks at the way that corporations – business of any size – can leverage the technologies and processes within the Internet of Everything to learn more about employees’ hidden talents, and to tailor jobs and tasks more closely to their abilities.  Here is an excerpt:

How, for example, could a regional manager identify a great candidate who is both willing and able to take on a new and risky project? How might the skills required – leadership, comfort with risk, diligence, delegation, discipline – be truly demonstrated? Social media sites such as Facebook are natural places to discover such abilities, not through overt verbal job titles, but through actual real-life proof. For example, consider an employee who reveals on her Facebook site that she loves to scuba dive and is certified to teach scuba to others. The connection between the ability to lead people through risky behavior in this way might not show up on a traditional personality assessment or performance review, but it is evident in her real life activities.

How about those individuals who are natural communicators? The ones who, for whatever reason, everyone turns to in order to get things done? Not because they are workaholics, but because they have a natural ability to network, to put people in touch with other people, to move, shake and make things happen? Technology that identify these types of people as well as fostering the same types of connective behavior in others will strongly assist in breaking down silos and enhancing the productivity and profitability potential of a company or department.

To read the full article, please visit CloudTweaks here.

The Internet of Everything and the Public Sector

July 10, 2014

In addition to my own posts, I also write for CloudTweaks, an authority on cloud computing. Cloudtweaks is currently working with Cisco, who have released and exciting new thought leadership platform called InnovateThink. I have been asked to contribute some material to this project, and it is an honor to do so.

My sixth article looks at the way governments, or more precisely the public sector are taking advantage of the The Internet of Everything to deliver new services to its citizens. Here is an excerpt:

If you live in Chicago and you want to know when the street sweeper is coming around so you can move your car and avoid getting a ticket, well, there’s an app for that. It’s a simple yet elegant solution produced by one of an army of app developers that the city’s public service has engaged to capitalize on the ever-growing usefulness of the Internet of Everything, defined by Cisco as the juncture of people, process, data and things.

Traditionally the public sector has been maligned as a place and mindset that is far from the cutting edge, with bureaucracy and partisan politics dominating. But increasingly an opposite perspective can be seen. Given the enormity and variety of the responsibilities held by government, the constant scarcity of funds, combined with increased calls for transparency and accountability, the opportunities offered by the connected technologies of the Internet of Everything are both appealing and fiscally prudent.

To read the full article, please visit CloudTweaks here.

 

Money, Currency and the Internet of Everything

In addition to my own posts, I also write for CloudTweaks, an authority on cloud computing. Cloudtweaks is currently working with Cisco, who have released and exciting new thought leadership platform called InnovateThink. I have been asked to contribute some material to this project, and it is an honor to do so.

My fifth article focuses on money, or at least virtual money, which is not only representative of the Internet of Everything, it also promises also to play a major role in the way things are bought and paid for.

Here is an excerpt:

In terms of the Internet of Everything, virtual currencies such as BitCoin allow for a wider range of actions that traditional banks find too costly to touch, and who make too expensive to use, such as micro-transactions. These small purchases may be the equivalent of a couple of cents, and would allow consumers, or their IoE-enabled possessions, to pay a small fee for to access a single news story on a news website, for example, removing the need for banner ads and other old-school monetization techniques, and allowing a greater sense of pay-as-you-go-only-for-what-you-need.

BitCoin is not the only virtual currency out there. In fact there are many dozens, if not hundreds of virtual currencies vying for market attention. BitCoin is only the most famous of the bunch – for now. But together they represent change, and a significant move toward decentralization and virtualization, just as cloud technologies are doing with big data.

To read the full post, please visit CloudTweaks here.

The Internet of Everything – From the Ground Up

In addition to my own posts, I also write for CloudTweaks, an authority on cloud computing. Cloudtweaks is currently working with Cisco, who have released and exciting new thought leadership platform called InnovateThink. I have been asked to contribute some material to this project, and it is an honor to do so.

My first article is an overview of the Internet of Everything, and is entitled The Internet Of Everything From The Ground Up. Here is an excerpt:

Traffic chaos in crowded city streets is largely the result of several thousand independent beings (i.e. vehicles and their drivers) all seeking a direct route to their own particular destinations in competition with each other. Every time they stop at a traffic light, to pay at a parking lot, to find a space or to merge into already congested traffic, the ripple effect travels backwards, holding up hundreds more. There is a direct similarity here to the time and productivity gridlock that occurred in business in the pre-IoE era: employees working in silos, on workstations with seat-license software, connected only by the still woefully inadequate and obstructionist technology called email, and meeting occasionally in boardrooms.

The magic of IoE for smart cities is the development of a larger-scale city-wide awareness in which IoE technologies transform the commuting individual into a component of a larger entity – one in which a car and a phone merge into an intelligent life-device and the city itself functions more as an organic being. Small cities such as San Carlos, California, and larger cities such as Barcelona and Amsterdam have started to roll out integrated traffic management systems as part of a city-wide embrace of IoE as an economic solution to high-density life. This ushers in a proactive solution to transit woes: an inoculation against the problem, rather than a Band-Aid upon it.

To read the full post, please visit CloudTweaks here.

Understanding Big Data

In addition to my own posts, I also write for CloudTweaks, an authority on cloud computing. My most recent post focuses on understanding Big Data. Here is an excerpt:

What do Wal-Mart, Facebook and the Hadron Collider have in common? They are just three of many large organizations who are major consumers and processors of Big Data, a term that is becoming a greater priority for companies around the world as they struggle with a ceaseless and ever growing ocean of information.

The short definition of Big Data is that it represents all of the data in your organization – not just one type. Data resides in all business functions: marketing, finance, operations, research & development, customer experience – everywhere – and it essentially comes in three flavors: structured, unstructured and binary.

Structured data is the type of information that is organized and indexable, and consequently is most often stored in databases or annotated documents. This could include records and files. Unstructured data refers to loose material such as emails and tweets, and according to some estimates, may comprise 80% or even 90% of a company’s potentially useable information. Binary data refers to photographs and other media that is generally stored using binary formats.

In a recent podcast delivered by Mike Gualtieri, Principal Analyst, Forrester Research, Inc., and Milan Vaclavik, Senior Director & Solution Lead for CenturyLink Technology Solutions, it was noted that 70% of IT decision-makers see big data analytics as a priority within one year. This makes sense. For a company to fully understand where it is going, what its customers need, and how it compares to the marketplace, it must be able to access and use all of its data quickly and comprehensively. Currently, for most companies, this data is segmented into silos, with different storage mechanisms running on different platforms overseen by different people. So in a sense, Big Data at this moment in time, does not so much represent bits of information. The term better represents a concept, a problem, and a solution.

To read the full post, please visit CloudTweaks here.

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How the Collaborative Economy beats Death by Meeting

Sleeping-in-MeetingIn addition to my own posts, I also write for CloudTweaks, an authority on cloud computing. My most recent post focuses on the collaborative economy and focuses on new technologies that will help remove the tradition of Death by Meeting. This article was written in support of the ZeroDistance initiative. Here is an excerpt:

For decades now, busy working people have struggled with time and tasks in the workplace. Meetings have been especially difficult, in that for all their great intentions, they are still identified as one of the greatest time wasters of all (followed closely by email). Consequently there is a strong economic incentive to refine the way meetings are run. However up until recently, there existed no practical alternative to the act of stuffing a collection of people in a room with the goal of having them emerge with some level of consensus.

But now the age of ZeroDistance has arrived, and disruptive technologies are challenging the way things are done, breaking down the walls of a long-established status quo and replacing them with more productive alternatives. Perhaps there is no better example of this than the very common scenario known as the “meeting.”

To read more, please click here.

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