Those Annoying LinkedIn Reminders

A short while back I read a comment on LinkedIn concerning those “annoying” work anniversary reminders. The complaint was about LinkedIn jamming people’s inboxes with needless reminders that “nobody reads or cares about anyway.” The comment had thousands of “likes,” suggesting many other people feel the same way.

But hold on a second. There’s so much reason to read and care about these notifications, if you just take a moment to to consider who they are there for. They are there for you.

These anniversary/achievement announcements provide each of us with a reason to reach out and reconnect with a person in our networks. Don’t forget: your personal network of the people you know, trust and respect, and who feel the same about you, is your greatest career safety net.

Too often the people we meet in the course of business fade away through neglect. We are all too busy to keep in touch, go to events, have lunch with people in a proactive manner. It all seems like a huge waste of time. But it is these people who provide leads, references, guidance, mentorship, and maybe even that next job opportunity for you or someone in your family. Your network is a net. No one should work without a net.

Those Notifications are for You, not Them

When an anniversary notification appears, either on the LinkedIn home screen, in your in-box, this is your chance to say “hi” once again. To keep the memory of you alive in the heart and mind of that individual. By sending them a quick heartfelt message (not just clicking the “Like” button, but an actual message), you are acknowledging that person’s dignity, hard work, and achievement. Even if they themselves have forgotten that it is their “5 year anniversary,” your reminder will touch them on an emotional level and will mean a great deal. As the expression goes, it’s not what you do with people, it is how you make them feel, that counts the most.

If the person whose work anniversary it is, is someone you don’t know, then they either a.) should not be in your collection of contacts; or b.) should be contacted in order that you get to know that person better. It is the Achilles Heel of LinkedIn that you can connect with anybody and everybody, for that is not its purpose.

Your Little Black Book

The value of LinkedIn is in the pedigree of your contacts. Every person you connect to should be someone you know, trust and respect. Someone who you would recognize if you met them on the street. Someone you would gladly shake hands with. LinkedIn is not a phonebook. It should not be a directory of every person you have every encountered or who has asked you to connect. LinkedIn should be your little black book, consisting of those people who are special to you – people with whom you have a great history.

If there are people in your collection that you do not know, then they should be pruned out of there, or improved. Not left as anonymous, meaningless people.

When these people mean something to you, the notifications will no longer be annoyances, clogging your inbox or screen. They will appear as what they should be: opportunity knocking. They represent a chance for you to quickly refine and add value to that most important of career assets: your network.

This is an excerpt from my book, Cool Time: A Hands-On Plan for Managing Work and Balancing Time. If you would like a copy, hop on over to my Books page. If you would like a workshop at your location, or if you would like to attend a live webcast, check out the details at my company, Bristall.com. If you would like me to come and speak to your group, contact details are available on my Speaker page. If you would like to listen to my podcast, check it out here. Either way, you will win back time and money. It’s just practical common sense.

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